Quick Answer: How Do You Use Chiasmus In A Sentence?

What is metonymy and examples?

Metonymy is the use of a linked term to stand in for an object or concept.

Sometimes metonymy is chosen because it’s a well-known characteristic of the concept.

A famous example is, “The pen is mightier than the sword,” from Edward Bulwer Lytton’s play Richelieu..

What is an example of Antimetabole?

Antimetabole Definition Antimetabole is derived from a Greek word which means “turning about.” It is a literary term or device that involves repeating a phrase in reverse order. For example: “You like it; it likes you.” “Fair is foul and foul is fair.”

How do you write chiasmus?

The structure of a chiasmus is pretty simple, so they aren’t difficult to craft. All you have to do is make up the first half of the sentence, and then flip a couple of words around for the second half.

What does Chastic mean?

chiasmus. a reversal in the order of words in two otherwise parallel phrases, as “flowers are lovely, love is flowerlike” (Coleridge). — chiastic, adj. See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices.

What is the meaning of chiasmus and examples?

Chiasmus is a figure of speech in which the grammar of one phrase is inverted in the following phrase, such that two key concepts from the original phrase reappear in the second phrase in inverted order. … The sentence “She has all my love; my heart belongs to her,” is an example of chiasmus.

Why is chiasmus used?

The Importance of Chiasmus. The chiasmus creates a highly symmetrical structure, and gives the impression of completeness. … In addition, chiasmus often uses parallelism, one of the most important structures in all of rhetoric. Parallelism is extremely effective because our brains process it much more quickly.

What does Inclusio mean?

In biblical studies, inclusio is a literary device based on a concentric principle, also known as bracketing or an envelope structure, which consists of creating a frame by placing similar material at the beginning and end of a section, although whether this material should consist of a word or a phrase, or whether …

What does Hyperbaton mean?

Hyperbaton /haɪˈpɜːrbətɒn/ in its original meaning is a figure of speech where a phrase is made discontinuous by the insertion of other words. In modern usage, the term is also used more generally for figures of speech that transpose the natural word order in sentences (also called anastrophe).

What is a Palistrophe?

chiasmus (English) rhetoric – An inversion of the relationship between the elements of phrases.

What is the meaning of chaotic?

adjective. 1In a state of complete confusion and disorder. ‘the political situation was chaotic’ More example sentences. ‘People are very confused in this chaotic world about what is really the right thing to do.

What does anaphora mean?

Anaphora is repetition at the beginning of a sentence to create emphasis. Anaphora serves the purpose of delivering an artistic effect to a passage. It is also used to appeal to the emotions of the audience in order to persuade, inspire, motivate and encourage them.

What is a Chiastic statement?

Chiasmus is the reversing of the order of words in the second of two parallel phrases or sentences. … Antimetabole refers to using the same words in both phrases or sentences but reversing the order to change the meaning and create rhetorical impact.

What is chiasmus and examples?

Chiasmus is a rhetorical device in which two or more clauses are balanced against each other by the reversal of their structures in order to produce an artistic effect. Let us try to understand chiasmus with the help of an example: “Never let a Fool Kiss You or a Kiss Fool You.”

What is an Asyndeton example?

Asyndeton (from the Greek: ἀσύνδετον, “unconnected”, sometimes called asyndetism) is a literary scheme in which one or several conjunctions are deliberately omitted from a series of related clauses. Examples include veni, vidi, vici and its English translation “I came, I saw, I conquered”.

What does chiasmus mean?

In rhetoric, chiasmus or, less commonly, chiasm (Latin term from Greek χίασμα, “crossing”, from the Greek χιάζω, chiázō, “to shape like the letter Χ”), is a “reversal of grammatical structures in successive phrases or clauses – but no repetition of words”.